January 10th 2022

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

January 3rd 2022

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2022!
WARM WISHES AND NEW ADVENTURES

December 13th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
MINYADES
An exhibition of paintings by Richard Höglund
The Bonnier Gallery, Miami
December 2021
A Catalogue Essay

December 6th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
MISCHA KUBALL
ReferenzRäume
Museum Morsbroich
5 December – 24 April 2022

November 29th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
ABOUT THE TREES
Thanksgiving 2021

November 25th 2021

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

November 15th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
THE WORLD MAP
Thanks to Mr Hide

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November 8th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
KOEN VANMECHELEN LABIOMISTA, GENK (BELGIUM)
The book launch and debate
“NOT TO BE MISTAKEN”, November, 4th

October 25th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
OCTOBER 2021
"Linda Karshan: The Covid-19 Conversation"
Still in the limelight

October 18th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
IDE TO POLAND
POSTSCRIPT PARIS

October 11th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
IDE TO POLAND III
Out of the oven
Warsaw Sept 28-Oct 3

October 5th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
HELMUT FEDERLE
NOVARTIS Campus – Forum 3, Basel
DIENER & DIENER - WIEDERIN
2005

October 2nd 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
BETWEEN LISTENING AND TELLING
Esther Shalev Gerz
Nuit Blanche Paris,
Tonight

September 27th 2021

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

September 20th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
ART BASEL HALL 2.0C1
René Schmitt and ART & LANGUAGE
THESE SCENES, 2016

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September 6th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
MISCHA KUBALL
Wolfsburg and Utopias

August 30th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
IDE TO POLAND II
A new expedition on the CERAMIC & FOOD ROUTE
Bright blue and white ceramics fill the dining room with warmth and visual appeal

August 23rd 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
IDE TO POLAND I
A new expedition on the CERAMIC & FOOD ROUTE
Starts today in Warsaw through 3 October

August 2nd 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
ESTHER SHALEV-GERZ
SUMMER IN PARIS

July 30th 2021

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

July 26th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
ON THE ROAD AGAIN
ARCO MADRID,
1st Art Fair in 2 years

July 23rd 2021

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

July 19th 2021

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

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July 16th 2021

UNAPOLOGETIC CONTENT.

July 12th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
IN THE ARTIST'S STUDIO
JASON BUTLER "THE COLLAGES"
Pop-Up Exhibition, Jersey

July 5th 2021

STILL BEHIND THE SCENES:
NINA NOWAK'S EXHIBITION
Galleri Susanne Ottesen, Copenhagen

June 28th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
PER KIRKEBY UNREALISED BRICK PROJECTS
Galleri Susanne Ottesen, Copenhagen

June 21st 2021

NEW ARRIVALS:
MISCHA KUBALL

June 18th 2021

A WALK IN MY LIBRARY:
HELMUT FEDERLE NIETZSCHE-HAUS SILS-MARIA
Schwabe AG Basel, 2004 Peter André Bloch & Jan Thorn-Prikker
on the occasion of Helmut Federle's "Edelweiss im Nietzsche-Haus, Sils-Maria" exhibition in Nietzsche's Haus, Sept 2004 to July 2005

June 14th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
L'INTERSTICE ARLES OPENING
JOSETTE SAYERS AND GUILLAUME ZUILI'S PHOTOGRAPHS
Brave and fearless

June 4th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
THE LAUNCH OF REAL TIME AND THE 3BS

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May 24th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
MATHILDE BRETILLOT DESIGNS NEW MUSEUM FOR LA MANUFACTURE DE GIEN

May 17th 2021

THIS TIME TWO YEARS AGO:
DRAW ART FAIR, LONDON, 2019, DESIGNER MATHILDE BRETILLOT AND ARCHITECT MISKA MILLER-LOVEGROVE

May 10th 2021

NEW ARRIVALS:
WETTERLING, STOCKHOLM

April 25th 2021

A WALK IN MY LIBRARY:
HELMUT FEDERLE
ABSTRACT PAINTING OF AMERICA AND EUROPE
Ritter Verlag, Galerie nächst St. Stephan, Vienna Rosemarie Schwarzwälder, 1988

April 11th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
LUKAS HOFFMANN, CNAP ACQUISITION AND TWO EXHIBITIONS

April 9th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
ESTHER SHALEV-GERZ, WEFRAC 2021

February 22nd 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
RICHARD MILAZZO OBSZINE #3
The Sadness of Bad Thinking

February 15th 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
RICHARD MILAZZO OBSZINE #3, ART, POETRY, AND THE PATHOS OF COMMUNICATION,
The Art of Impeachment

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February 1st 2021

BEHIND THE SCENES:
WITH POET/CURATOR RICHARD MILAZZO
REVISITING OBSZINE #3

January 12th 2021

A WALK IN MY LIBRARY:
POETRY IN SEDITIOUS TIMES

January 5th 2021

HAPPY NEW YEAR AND SOUVENIRS FROM 2020!

December 31st 2020

A WALK IN MY LIBRARY:
DECEMBER 31, 2020. JASON BUTLER'S EXHIBITION
Meyer Schapiro, “Theory and Philosophy of Art: Style, Artist and Society

December 18th 2020

BEHIND THE SCENES:
LIOR GALL, BRUSSELS, 2020

December 11th 2020

HIGHLIGHT:
LOVE LETTERS
A new participative project by artist Koen Vanmechelen

December 4th 2020

BEHIND THE SCENES:
LINDA KARSHAN AND THE BROOKLYN RAIL

November 27th 2020

BEHIND THE SCENES:
NOVEMBER 2020, LINDA KARSHAN
The Covid Conversation, A New Film

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November 6th 2020

A WALK IN MY LIBRARY:
PARIS, NOV. 6, 2020
ABËTËI by Ishmael Fiifi Annobil

October 20th 2020

BEHIND THE SCENES:
MATHILDE BRETILLOT
Designs new offices for Parfums de Marly, Paris

October 12th 2020

BEHIND THE SCENES:
BERLIN STUDIO VISIT - LUKAS HOFFMANN

all posts title image
Lukas Hoffmann’s studio

BEHIND THE SCENES:
BERLIN STUDIO VISIT – LUKAS HOFFMANN

October 12th 2020

Part I

I have been interested in the work of Lukas Hoffmann since his first group show eight years ago, where a flat side wall of a suburban Swiss apartment house rose blankly up from the foreground; black and white, crisp, formalist, austere, but awkwardly tender if not registering some kind of loss. He has worked continuously over the years with a large box camera – in a process that I tell people is akin to hunting for moments and forgotten views. He is a conceptual artist whose art is about places he finds when he is walking or riding a bicycle or pushing a baby carriage. Unseen corners of typical neighborhoods, places concrete and chain link fences get mashed up, tangled green areas outside suburban sprawl. This perspective – though certainly not the same visual language or eye – shares a kind of territory with Dutch conceptualist decades his senior, Jan Dibbets.

Hoffmann has been attracted from the beginning to anonymous spaces and architectural views we pass without a second glance: a break in the curb at the edge of parking by apartments, facades in shadow, a broken fence. Things in the wrong place because no one cared and threw them thoughtlessly, or because they fell that way without fanfare. 

There is no causality in this work. It is just like that. Chaotic accumulations through his eye become elegant and spare. He looks at everyday places in familiar domestic situations. Generic Swiss towns on the edge of unkempt landscapes that tidy villages keep at bay.

My first vivid response to his work was in Zug, maybe 2012/13. I laugh now thinking how easy it was to jump on trains from Zurich; easy then to see shows of young artists. He made a radical twenty-four part work, photographs of a hedgerow that gave me goose bumps as I walked back and forth slowly taking in the nondescript aspect of this accumulation of tangles and knots you would normally pass by without taking notice.

Lukas Hoffmann’s studio

Part II

Being there. He manages to raise the aesthetic nature of this abandoned row of shrubs that covers so much of the world we never stop to look. In his box camera the details sing, one meter after the next, a chorus so loud that I still remember the experience all these years later.

This work struck me as so important that when he showed me the dummy of the book that accompanies his current museum exhibition and it didn’t include this, I raised a huge fuss. He stopped the printing scheduled for the following day and revised the layout with the designer to include this 24-part silver gelatin print work as a leporello, an accordion-pleated insert. You will see a photo of it in this post. The book UNTITLED OVERGROWTH, is wonderful.

Going back to Berlin, I had not seen Lukas in a year or so, and he had taken a new studio, which we see here as a storefront, the entry where a big table sits between stacks of wrapped works.

Lukas Hoffmann unboxing big box camera

The large box camera is nearby and he shows me again its structure and the massive negatives. There is a darkroom downstairs and he is working on a recent commission, the sculptural frame on the studio wall.

Lukas Hoffmann unboxing big box camera

I want to mention here the Bronx Wall work as well with three spreads as details. He had a fellowship in New York over two years ago, and spent time wandering in Brooklyn and the Bronx for places that were his kind of spots, pushing his son in the stroller for hours on end. It was on one of these walks that he found the distressed walls you see here.

Installation view, “Bronx River Avenue, NYC”, six gelatin silver prints, 178,5x121cm each, 2016
Separate panels from “Bronx River Avenue, NYC”, 2016 in “UNTITLED OVERGROWTH” published by Spectorbooks with the support of Erna and Curt Burgauer Stiftung, #kantonzug and Prohelvetia
Separate panels from “Bronx River Avenue, NYC”, 2016 in “UNTITLED OVERGROWTH” published by Spectorbooks with the support of Erna and Curt Burgauer Stiftung, #kantonzug and Prohelvetia
Separate panels from “Bronx River Avenue, NYC”, 2016 in “UNTITLED OVERGROWTH” published by Spectorbooks with the support of Erna and Curt Burgauer Stiftung, #kantonzug and Prohelvetia

Following his return to Europe there is a new series of street photographs taken with almost a hidden camera held at his waist has the studied casualness of a crowd, where you sense the nature of someone’s character by the way their shorts graze a knee, or the way a purse is worn slightly akimbo. The sweep of motion is palpable along with the light of the sun and the street sounds.

Close-up, “Strassenbild”, sixteen gelatin silver print, 102 x 72cm each, 2019

Part III

From UNTITLED OVERGROWTH

Dr. Matthias Haldemann is Director Kunsthaus Zug

Image Formation

On Lukas Hoffmann’s Recent Photographs

Cover of “UNTITLED OVERGROWTH”, by Lukas Hoffmann, published by Spector Books, Leipzig, 2019, 100 pages

“A paradox is already inherent in the creation of these works. For instance, when the artist, during his expeditions on foot or by bicycle through the tangled urban outskirts of Berlin or New York, becomes aware of unassuming corners devoid of people – chilly facades, back courtyards, underpasses, construction sites, hedges run rampant, and wastelands. And when he later returns there with his large-format camera to take planned photographs. His circumspect treatment of the incidental, the provisional, the commonplace, the stagnant and the abandoned things with under-determined identity, continues during the developing process in his own darkroom, where he meticulously enlarges and frames each of the rigorously culled images.”

“The photographic constellations of visibility prove to be transitionally tipping intermediate products of reality and image, which have their own strong immediacy and presence. They exist directly in the here and now, showing what is really absent in the there and once, creating associations of inner, remembered images, yet are neither the one nor the other. In the experience of the seeing seen, the remembered, the imagined, and the animated created in an image in proper time, something open-yet-concealed appears: a possible accrual of being.”

Leporello of “Hecke bei Malchow, Berlin”, twenty-four gelatin silver prints, 71 x 55cm each, 2012

Part IV

From UNTITLED OVERGROWTH

Maren Lubbke-Tidow

Realms of Dissemblance

On the Pictorial Methods of the

Photographer Lukas Hoffmann

“When viewing this work, we intuitively know that anything “additional” or “more” that we may discern there comes from our capacity for imagination. Hoffmann’s work is very generally aligned to the project of (postwar) modernism, and he works with images in which the creative issues so evident in art during that period are now reappearing today.”

 “Hoffmann’s project involves finding, in his medium, a productive way of dealing with this decisive paradigm of photography – while simultaneously developing a specific visual program that allows him to depart slightly from this very paradigm; or that at least allows it to recede into the background of perception. At any rate, we can definitely note that it is possible to name the referent in all of Lukas Hoffmann’s photographs. He uses an analogue large-format camera to take pictures in areas that we would designate as places of small industry, agriculture, housing developments. Or even just as abandoned or overgrown sites. Most recently, portraits have been added. I consider this decision on the part of the artist- namely, allowing the referent of his images to remain identifiable despite the moments of disorientation that are played with here – to be a decisive commitment to his medium, to photography. An approach to reading his images which asserts that the photographic apparatus only serves as a means to an end, so as to give his viewers something “else” – namely, a picture reminiscent of a drawing or painting – is not appropriate for his work, even if we are inclined to consider his pictorial works within the context of other forms of fine art.”